Bempton May 2013

Some photos from the Wilmslow Guild coach trip to Bempton on 12 May 2013. The official report can be read in the Trip Reports section.

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The cliffs at bempton, looking south.

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Part of the Gannet colony. They are dispersed all over the cliff face.

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The Gannets fly along quite close to the cliff top.

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This view from further above shows the full spread of the Gannet's wings.

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Some of the gannets were sitting on eggs.

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They don't have much room on the cliff face.

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A close-up showing the fine markings around the face. They appear to have blue eyes.

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Guillemots are the most common birds on the Bempton cliffs and occur in groups on the ledges along the cliff face.

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On the bigger ledges they huddle together in large groups.

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A nice pair of Guillemots.

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Not always pleasant out there on the cliff.

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A "bridled" Guillemot showing its white monocle very nicely. This is still the same species, only a colour morph. The field guides tell us that the proportion of "bridled" Guillemots in the population increases the further you go north. There were only a few here.

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Another "bridled" Guillemot.

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Rock Doves (or feral pigeons?). They mostly appear to have the double black wing bars of Rock Doves and the one flying on the left appears to have a white rump, also diagnostic of Rock Doves. However many also look more like feral pigeons so I suspect it is a mixed flock.

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Kittiwakes nest in large colonies along the cliff face.

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Kittiwakes build a cup nest out of mud and grass. I couldn't see eggs in any of the nests yet.

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A Herring Gull. They nest on the cliffs here as well.

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Puffins are the least common of the auks found at Bempton. Usually found near the grassy slopes at the top.

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Everyone loves a Puffin.

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Unlike Guillemots, Razorbills are usually found only in ones or twos on the ledges. They have a broad bill with white strips.

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Maybe a pair not yet breeding.

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The inside of the Razorbill's mouth is a wonderful yellow colour.

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There were Tree Sparrows in the bushes around the Visitor Centre. This male is showing his brown cap very well.

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Look at the fine detail of the feathers, with subtle shades of brown, black and white. Who said that sparrows are just little brown jobs?


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